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The Virtual Troops of the Chavista Revolution have their Matrix

Even Diosdado Cabello has false followers. The Government of Venezuela has been able to measure itself in political cyberspace. Hence, it has created an authentic machinery of robots at the service of the governing party in social media that is mainly controlled by public officials and coordinated from ministries. This is the result of several studies, testimonials and applications that measure the "Twitterzuela" convulsion.

1/14/2018 12:00:00 AM

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At the cry of "troop", Mario Silva, a legendary presenter of the Venezuelan television channel (VTV), used to decree trends on Twitter. The call to post tags favorable to the ruling party in this social media was followed by other faces of the public television. Thus, Chavismo has earned for years a privileged space on the Trending Topics list in Venezuela. But that is not the result of force of popularity or simple influence of followers only. Or, at least, that is what documents like last year’s leak from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Justice and the virtual programs that detect a virtual army at the service of the self-styled Bolivarian revolution showed.

The Government of Venezuela stands out among 28 countries evaluated by the University of Oxford, presented in the report "Troops, Trolls and Troublemakers: A Global Inventory of Organized Social Media Manipulation" (published in 2017), which appeal to a range of cybernetic tools to try to penetrate virtual audiences. Based on the 37-folio study, these troops are directed from the Ministry of Communication and Information with money from the Venezuelan State and with political objectives. Other nations analyzed were Vietnam, North Korea, Ecuador, China, the Philippines, Iran, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Israel, Mexico, the United States of America, Ukraine, Germany or India. "Cybernetic troops are often made up of a variety of different players. In some cases, governments have their own internal teams that are employed as public officials. In others, talent is subcontracted to contractors or private volunteers," explains the study.

At the cry of "troop", Mario Silva, a legendary presenter of the Venezuelan television channel (VTV), used to decree trends on Twitter. The call to post tags favorable to the ruling party in this social media was followed by other faces of the public television. Thus, Chavismo has earned for years a privileged space on the Trending Topics list in Venezuela. But that is not the result of force of popularity or simple influence of followers only. Or, at least, that is what documents like last year’s leak from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Justice and the virtual programs that detect a virtual army at the service of the self-styled Bolivarian revolution showed.

The Government of Venezuela stands out among 28 countries evaluated by the University of Oxford, presented in the report "Troops, Trolls and Troublemakers: A Global Inventory of Organized Social Media Manipulation" (published in 2017), which appeal to a range of cybernetic tools to try to penetrate virtual audiences. Based on the 37-folio study, these troops are directed from the Ministry of Communication and Information with money from the Venezuelan State and with political objectives. Other nations analyzed were Vietnam, North Korea, Ecuador, China, the Philippines, Iran, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Israel, Mexico, the United States of America, Ukraine, Germany or India. "Cybernetic troops are often made up of a variety of different players. In some cases, governments have their own internal teams that are employed as public officials. In others, talent is subcontracted to contractors or private volunteers," explains the study.